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Solomon’s Song of Songs Chapter 6 Notes

Posted by lehunt on June 21, 2015

Song of Solomon Vineyards // larryhuntbiblecommentary.wordpress.com

Chapter 6

v. 2: This seems really abrupt, but I guess one is supposed to understand that the search for the Beloved has ended happily and faster than expected.  Note also the abrupt end of the search in the parallel section: “scarcely had I passed by them [the watch] when I found the one I love…” (3:4).

v. 3: See also 2:16 and 4:5.

v. 4: Her beauty has as much power over him as an army would.  He is helpless before it.  Umberto Eco uses this line very effectively in The Name of the Rose.

v. 9: I agree with Murphy when he writes, “The point is the uniqueness of the woman, not that she is an only child” (175).  1:6 indicates that she does have brothers.  The Beloved is singling her out as special.  If Solomon is the Beloved, this is particularly poignant since he had so many wives and concubines.  In fact, he may be referring to his harem in 6:8 before he contrasts its great numbers with the Shulamite’s uniqueness.

v. 10: This rhetorical question, “Who is she who looks forth as the morning?” reminds me of the rhetorical question in 3:6.  The answer to both is the Shulamite, whose appearance is splendid.

v. 11: I’m not sure how to interpret this since the speaker is unclear.  Barnes believes the woman is speaking (133), Gordis believes it is the man (67).  Murphy simply says, “It is difficult to determine who is the speaker” (178).

v. 12: I’m not going to attempt to explain this.  According to Murphy (179) and Gordis (67), the text, as it stands, is incomprehensible.

v. 13: Whatever verses 11 and 12 mean, this verse seems to be spoken by the Beloved as well as his friends (previously mentioned in 5:1).  They are calling upon her to dance for them.  Her response is a coy and flirtatious acceptance of the call.

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